How to Observe Good, Proper Etiquette during a Wine-Tasting Event


Wine tastings no longer function as exclusive events for well-to-do members of society today or wine experts alone. Today these types of events open their doors average, middle class members of society. If you find yourself invited to such a special and social event for the first time, you will want to check out to prepare to make the experience favorable and leave a positive impression. Follow these tips to help you prepare.

  • Listen to and follow the directions the party usher offers. He will provide you with details about the event and where to get the wine-tasting guide. Remember not to cross into an unauthorized area.

  • Check out and study the wine-tasting guide or menu for the event before going to the serving station. Having an idea of what the event will serve will help you determine which wine you want to taste first.
  • Proceed to the tasting bar or pouring station and present yourself in a friendly manner. Listen while the staff members provide information about the wines served. You may ask questions related to the presentation. On the other hand, do not ask the person to open more wine not included on the wine tasting list. If possible, you should also memorize or at least familiarize yourself with the names and characteristics of each wine offered to make it easier to ask questions.
  • A wine-tasting party functions as a social event exclusive for a few numbers of people. As such, you can create a good or bad impression that other guests will definitely remember. Listen carefully and attentively to topics of discussion regarding the insight of the wine experts. Ask questions about the aroma, flavor and color as well as its production history. This shows your interest in what you might learn at this event—and not just because of the drinks you can get for free.
  • The host will offer different wines for the event, so you can focus on the ones about which you want to learn more. You won’t break any protocol just because you have chosen only a few to taste. Others in attendance will absolutely understand if you don’t finish a wine you find less interesting. Wine tasking does not mean you have to finish everything on your glass even if you don’t like the taste.
  • Once you finish a wine and decide to taste another on the list, use the available water to clean your glass. The host should see to it that attendees have plenty of water for rinsing. For instance, you don’t want the remnants of red wine mixed with white or dessert wines. Normally the host will also provide a decorative container in which to empty your glass before proceeding to the next wine on the list.

    Filed Under: Food & Cooking

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    About the Author: Leona Kesler is a head-chef at a very popular food restaurant in New York. Also she is a blogger who shares her experiences, tips, and other informative details about food and cooking. Her recipes are featured on many magazines.

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